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Los Angeles TimesUp Close and Texan

The Los Angeles Times
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
December 30, 2004

Visitors for the big 'fooba' game have their own ways. So listen up, all y'all.

Perhaps you've noticed the sudden appearance of 40,000 or so strange-looking tourists in Pasadena and nearby environs - the ones in burnt-orange golf outfits with big hats and big hair that block your views of the San Gabriels.

If you've leaned in close trying to decipher the language they're speaking, you might have overheard phrases like "fooba" or "purtier'n Tyler." And if you've followed them, you've noticed how they get excited about the prospect of horses clopping down Colorado Boulevard on New Year's Day and go gaga about the Gap in Old Town Pasadena because it's nothing like the Gap back home.

These visitors are called Texans, a breed apart from the usual out-of-towners from the Midwest who typically materialize around this time of year. But this particular group is hardly composed of your run-of-the-mill, boot-scooting, Wrangler-wearing, pickup-driving, yee-hawing Texans. Rather, they are devotees of the Longhorns of the University of Texas (a.k.a. "The University") in a state where the only two sports that matter are football and spring football.

We Texans are by nature an exuberant, friendly and sometimes obnoxious lot. But this bunch is really over the top. Forgive them their arrogance (at least that which is not inherent), because they've never been to the Rose Bowl before and it's been a long, long time since they've been to any big bowl game.

Like all Texans, they speak with a pronounced accent that is sometimes hard to understand, a point driven home a few weeks ago at a bookstore in Michigan where I was searching for a copy of Life magazine.

"Laugh magazine?" the clerk said, shooting a funny look. "Never heard of it."

You might think you're hearing "techsuhsfaht" repeatedly, but that's really "Texas fight" with a severe drawl.

You will also notice their tendency to blurt out "Hook 'em!" and make odd little waving gestures whenever they encounter a fellow tourist.This arthritic expression of raised index and little fingers, with the middle and ring fingers held down with the thumb, is not a gang sign nor a heavy-metal rock-on signal. This is an affectionate shadow-puppet version of a Longhorn, the UT mascot, summoned to demonstrate faith that UT will gore the University of Michigan's Wolverines on Saturday.

If they suddenly turn somber, as if they're having a patriotic moment, it is advisable to give them plenty of space. The school song, "The Eyes of Texas," sung to the tune of "I've Been Working on the Railroad," is a celebration of paranoia. Of course, you'd be paranoid too if you went around singing, "Do not think you can escape them/ Rise up so early in the morn/ The Eyes of Texas are upon you/ Till Gabriel blows his horn."

Although more than a few of these UT boosters are in the oil and gas "bidness," which plays to the old Texas stereotype, many of the really serious fat cats reflect modern Texas' diversity. Their numbers include a character who is really named Jim Bob, who owns the world's biggest gold mine; the Dallas takeover artist who made George W. Bush a millionaire by paying him too much for his baseball team; a car dealer whose real name is Billy Joe but prefers to be called Red, who also happens to own an NFL team on the side; and the Houston lawyer who beat Pennzoil out of more than $1 billion in a lawsuit and has since spent so much of that loot on his alma mater that university officials have erected not one, but two statues in his likeness on campus. If you run into any of the above, there may be some benefit in placating them, like a really big tip.

To avoid offending the visitors, it's best to avoid addressing them as "you guys." Always refer to them as "y'all" except when referring to a group of them, when the proper reference is "all y'all." When in doubt, just give a knowing wink and smile and say, "yewbet."

Under no circumstances try to pander by suggesting the visitors sample the local Mexican food or barbecue - the California versions just don't cut it with this crowd and never will, no matter how much sour cream and avocado you pile on. As far as Texas fans are concerned, California is all bean sprouts and tofu anyway. Better to offer a really big steak. A side of beef is hard to mess up.

And don't talk politics or energy price gouging. If you must bring up a famous W. from Texas, better to discuss Willie (as in Nelson) than the president. The latter is embraced as a native son (even though he is in fact an Eastern blueblood born in Connecticut) mainly because he says "noo-cul-lar."

Which is another great thing about Texans. Anyone can be one. Declaring yourself a Texan is all the roots you'll ever need. It's like the popular bumper sticker says: "I Wasn't Born in Texas but I Got Here as Fast as I Could."

And if Texcess seems a tad overbearing, remember, it could be Texas A&M playing in the Rose Bowl instead. The University of Texas is in Austin, a blue island in a red-state sea that is frequently described by the rest of Texas as the People's Republic of Austin.

Aggies, by comparison, are the Lone Star bund, partial to military uniforms, knee-high leather boots and severe buzz cuts. Their "traditions" include spending the whole football game standing up with their hands on their knees, as if straining at stool. Fortunately, for UT fans and Californians alike, the Longhorns regularly whip the Aggies in football.

So all y'all make the best of this weekend. It could be worse. Honest.

[The Los Angeles Times]


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