Joe Nick Patoski - joenickp.com
Google
 

Texas | What Would Donald Judd Do? (page 6)

You are here: Texas » Features » What Would Donald Judd Do?
page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6


Donald JuddWhat Would Donald Judd Do? continued

Marianne Stockebrand too was struck by the landscapes and all the space when she first laid eyes on Marfa, in 1989; she was in the company of Donald Judd. "Coming from Europe, I was surprised by how far you could drive without seeing another car. The distances were startling." She was putting together a show of Judd's furniture and architecture projects for the Kšlnischer Kunstverein and was editing previously published essays for a book on his architecture when their relationship became more than professional. Judd was as drawn to the brown-eyed woman with the prominent, finely sculpted cheekbones as she was to him.

"He had a place in Cologne and opened a studio there," recalls Stockebrand. "And he asked me to come here and work at Chinati. When he was diagnosed, that didn't happen. "The two did, however, talk of marriage as Judd lay dying in a New York hospital.

When Stockebrand became its director, the Chinati Foundation had less than $500 in the bank. Since then, she has built a $2 million endowment, with a long-term target of $14 million to finish what Judd intended: preparing his concrete buildings to exhibit a large amount of his artwork currently in storage, creating a permanent installation for John Wesley's paintings, and documenting the site's military history.

But Stockebrand didn't just have to learn how to run a struggling foundation; she had to learn Marfa. "When she first came here, English was clearly her second language," one acquaintance recalls. "She was frosty in a Germanic way-very, very rigid. You'd never see her out in the community But the years have softened her. She shows up at parties. She attends events. She's much more integrated. Don Judd was a daunting figure. She can be that too. I wouldn't want to cross her."

Stockebrand lives in the heart of Juddville, between the old bank and old Safeway buildings Judd bought, and across the street from the Marfa Wool and Mohair building, where John Chamberlain's car wreck metal sculptures are exhibited. "She's the only person I've encountered who can live that minimalist lifestyle," a friend says, describing the small, Spartan residence, a block from the main drag, that Stockebrand shares with her two cats. No art or sentimental photographs adorn the walls, and furnishings are sparse, dominated by a Donald Judd desk.

She's a regular at the bookstore, she lunches at the coffee shop, and sometimes she shows up at art functions, but otherwise Stockebrand sticks to Chinati affairs, in Marfa and around the world. She clearly enjoys living in a place where she can be left alone. And yet she's also palpably happy about the way the Chinati has revitalized the community: "I wouldn't want to see this as an artists' colony in a kitschy sort of way-one souvenir shop next to another-but I think it's very nice to be able to buy olive oil here and have it on a salad with lettuce that wasn't wilted last week, as it used to be."

But while she has acclimated herself to Marfa, and the financial situation at the Chinati has improved, Stockebrand remains embroiled in the wrapping up of the estate, which has pitted her against the Judd kids. She believes the Chinati Foundation and the Judd Foundation should be managed as a single entity. "From the artistic point of view, they should be done together," she contends. "It's all Judd's work. It's this tiny town in Texas. Cohesion in planning and fund-raising makes sense." Such a merger, of course, would also bolster the Chinati's financial footing by eliminating competition for funding and allowing the combined foundation to sell off portions of the Judd estate when and if the public works project is threatened.

"Everything doesn't have to merge together like some great corporation," counters Rainer Judd. "Marianne doesn't want this [print] building here to exist. She believes it's not a permanent installation, and therefore isn't valid. It's a permanent exhibit. What's wrong with that? That's what he wanted. They've tried to get us to sell Spring Street before it's transferred to the Judd Foundation. But we can't bend [on that]. We're Judd's kids. We're the spine."

Richard Schlagman, owner of the art book publishing company Phaidon Press and president of the Judd Foundation, backs the kids up. "We absolutely don't want to sell Spring Street," Schlagman says. "Not at all. Ever. In my view it wasn't an actual desire to sell it on Marianne's part but a lack of seeing that it could be saved. I'm sure we can have both Maria and Spring Street."

Flavin Judd lays his cards on the table over breakfast burritos and green chile huevos rancheros at Carmen's Cafe (TIE YOUR HORSE AND COME ON IN, reads the sign out front), while his wife Michele nurses and fusses with their one-year-old son, Pascal. Flavin makes it clear that neither he nor his sister asked for the job of executor, and they sure as hell didn't know they'd have all the debt to clear up. "It's a lousy situation: all these vultures hovering, all these people pretending to care about the art and about Don."

Flavin has put the Porter House up for sale again. He's tired of Maria and Marfa art and Maria art politics, of the pressure to either settle the estate or resign as executor. "They've used figures of authority to scare us," he says. "They want us out. But we're not going anywhere. They don't understand. We didn't grow up with authority figures. We were always told that figures of authority don't know a fucking thing about art. Turns out it was true."

While the foundations duke it out and the Texas attorney general's office attempts to stop the continued bleeding of the estate and make sure Judd's assets are properly dispersed in accordance with the state's charitable trust laws, the town-art synergy has shifted to Lynn and Tim Crowley, the post-Judd "Judds" in Maria. Lynn ran Lynn Goode Gallery in Houston, one of that city's finer contemporary spaces; Tim is an attorney and sits on the Chinati board. Five years ago, after Lynn was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, they bought a place in Marfa as a retreat. Now it's almost a full-time residence. Their Marfa Book Co. has become the social center for the art crowd and much of the rest of the community. And they've gone on a buying spree-snatching up property in town and surrounding ranchland-that has inspired comparisons to Judd. With one major difference: Judd closed his houses and buildings to the public; the Crowleys want to open the spaces up, fill them with artists and art, and make them accessible.

Already Marfa is hopping in a way it hasn't since the movie production of Edna Ferber's Giant came to town, in 1955. El Paisano Hotel, the Spanish Baroque inn where Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, James Dean, Dennis Hopper, and the rest of the cast hung out, is coming back to life as a luxury lodge. Tourists can buy art to take home at Hecho en Marfa, a shop of locally made arts and handicrafts run by the nonprofit Marfa Studio of Arts. And one of the Crowleys' former bookstore employees has opened up a health food store.

But Tim Crowley says it's too early to call Marfa the next Santa Fe. 'Most of our friends from Houston are bewildered," he says, laughing. "They say, 'We heard about art, but all we saw were these huge blocks of concrete.' There's not much going on. The logistics are daunting. Marfa lacks health care, goods, and services. We don't have a drug store. We just got an ATM-I don't think anyone's used it yet. It's a tough-love, challenging type place. You have to want to be here. We just got a restaurant to stay open on Sunday. Before then, all you had was microwave chicken nuggets at the convenience store."

So what would Donald Judd have made of the new Marfa?

Rainer and Flavin Judd think he wouldn't have embraced it. "He didn't come here for Marfa," Flavin says. "He came for the mountains south of here, where the ranches were. If not for my sister and me going to school, he wouldn't have had much to do with Marfa. He was fed up with the town in 1993. He wanted to move his library down to the ranch."

By then Judd had achieved a degree of notoriety from some very public run-ins over noise from the local feed mill and ice plant. And odds are he wouldn't have liked the WWDJD? bumper sticker any more than his daughter does.

"That sticker was created by people who probably never met him," Rainer notes shortly before leaving town again. "People who think he must have been a megalomaniac to create all this."

Not a megalomaniac, perhaps, but a serious collector with very specific ideas about the way things should be. Both Stockebrand and the Judd kids are guided by what they think Donald Judd wanted, but getting an honest assessment from anyone else about who is or isn't on the right track is almost impossible, since so much is riding on what will be done with Judd's properties and extensive collections. The Crowleys, for example, have offered to buy the Print Building in Marfa; Tim Crowley says that the old Crews Hotel could be a nice hotel once again and that soon-to-be Marfa resident Liz Lambert, who owns the Hotel San Jose in Austin, a vintage motor court made over into a hip boutique lodging, could be the hotelier to do it. And John Vinson, an assistant attorney general involved in the case, has a residence in Marfa, too.

Ayala De Chinati, where Judd is buried, is on a south-facing promontory between the Chinati and Sierra Vieja mountain ranges, overlooking the valley of the Rio Grande a majestic landscape of canyons, peaks, and cliffs wholly devoid of humanity. To see it requires numerous formal requests, several telephone calls to landowners to secure permission to drive across their property without being shot at, signatures on forms on which one promises not to stray from the path, an all-terrain vehicle, and a pair of bolt cutters, since some "asshole landowner," as an estate employee puts it, has been putting new locks on gates, cutting off access to the place.

It's 60 miles of bad road from the rim of the Chinatis into Pinto Canyon and down onto the vast slope draining into the Rio Grande-three hours minimum. But when a thunderstorm parks over the Chinatis as darkness falls, dropping buckets of rain (the first rain in almost a year), and the road disappears altogether into a swift-moving stream, it's flat impossible. So I back up and turn around. Near Marfa there are car lights. (I haven't seen a car or person since I left town seven hours ago.) It's the US. Border Patrol. Motion sensors planted in the pavement must have tipped them off. They tail me all the way back into town.

WWDJD? I think he'd say it was worth every bit of the effort.

page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

[Marfa, TX Chamber of Commerce]

See also

  • The House That Judd Built Late artist Donald Judd worked and lived at the busy corner of Mercer and Spring Streets. His building and its contents–the art collection Judd accrued over a lifetime-may soon be available for public viewing. [Time Out New York, August 14-21, 2003]


Home - Contact - News/Appearances - Notes & Musings - Bio
Bibliography - Books - Music - Texas - Travel
Water - Misc - Photos - Links -

Copyright 2008 © Joe Nick Patoski, All Rights Reserved. - Website design: Jodi Jenkins