Joe Nick Patoski - joenickp.com
Google
 

Texas | What Would Donald Judd Do? (page 3)

You are here: Texas » Features » What Would Donald Judd Do?
1, 2, page 3, 4, 5, 6


Each page is shown with the original layout (text is below each image for ease in reading).

Donald Judd - page 3

Image: A bedroom at the Marfa compound.

It's not necessarily a healthy thing for a town to try to sort out Donald Judd's legacy, either. But that's what Maria has been doing, especially since last October, when art pilgrims began finding their way to this remote place in growing numbers to behold the Dan Flavin "Marfa Project," an untitled permanent installation of 360 fluorescent tubes in the barracks of an army camp that Judd turned into the Chinati Foundation (named for the mountain range between the site and the Rio Grande, with Mexico beyond).

After the pilgrims see the Flavin, and after they see Judd's 100 aluminum cubes housed in two airplane hangar-size artillery sheds, Judd's giant concrete cubes scattered across half a mile of grassland, the Claes Oldenburg horseshoe that perfectly frames Cathedral Mountain, Ilya Kabakov's too-close-for-comfort recreation of a Russian schoolhouse abandoned upon the fall of the Soviet Union, and the works of Roni Horn, Carl Andre, and John Wesley, they eventually find their way into town, where no matter where they go they're confronted with a cryptic question, posited on the rear bumpers of SUVs and crew cabs, across the fronts of T-shirts, and in the windows of stores: WWDJD? (What Would Donald Judd Do?, a takeoff of the teen Christian slogan What Would Jesus Do?).

The question goes a long way toward explaining the unusual connection between a cow town and a prominent artist who hated galleries and museums so much that he created his own art universe in far west Texas. It also speaks of the shadow Judd continues to cast, seven years after his death at the age of 65, and the endless rounds of second-guessing over what he had in mind when he stipulated in his will that a trust be created to protect his private holdings and collections, and then in a deathbed codicil named Marianne Stockebrand (whom he tapped before his death to succeed him as director of the Chinati Foundation) as an additional executor of his estate-along with his daughter Rainer, his now 33-year-old son Flavin, and his longtime attorney John J. Jerome and declared that Stockebrand "shall be in charge of the operation of any museum facility conducted by the trust."

1, 2, 3, continue to page 4, 5, 6


Home - Contact - News/Appearances - Notes & Musings - Bio
Bibliography - Books - Music - Texas - Travel
Water - Misc - Photos - Links -

Copyright 2008 © Joe Nick Patoski, All Rights Reserved. - Website design: Jodi Jenkins