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You are here: Music » Features » Willie Nelson - Gonna Catch Tomorrow Now (page 4)
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Read my MVP Q&A with Mickey Raphael, which ran in the next to last issue of No Depression. Order Willie Nelson: An Epic Life from Amazon here.


Gonna Catch Tomorrow Now (page 4)

No Depression
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
September-October 2004

Willie Nelson
Night Life: Ray Price and Willie Nelson, July 4, 2000. Photograph by John Carrico.

"Well, I decided I didn't want to make money out of it," he explains. "I did make it available on the internet," he said. (Words, lyrics, an MP3 audio of a simple performance, and a video of the song can be found at: www.kucinich.us/nelson_ poe_song.php) "Or you can go to SMN.com and hear me sing 'The War Prayer' and 'Jimmy's Road'; all those songs are there.

"The Democratic Party called and asked if they could include the song on the CD they're putting together of anti-war songs, anti-administration songs. The Democrats think that my song should fit in there. And I said, 'Go ahead. Because I don't want any money out of it.' But I still believe everything that's in there.

"I don't care about airplay. I knew it wouldn't get airplay because I know that there's hundreds of channels out there who are on the other side. They might play it and ridicule it a little bit. That's why I didn't send them a copy. I knew there was a couple of lines in there that might piss off a few folks. But if it didn't do that, I'd failed in what I was trying to do, which was to get the message across that what we're doing and the direction we're going is not right.

"In the song, I said a lot of things. You remember a long time ago when we heard all that, 'Don't believe anything you read, about half of what you see, and nothing you hear?' That's pretty much true. And if it was true back then, it's damned sure double true today. You can't believe what you hear. You can't believe what you see. So there you are.

"You have to start using your intuitions to say, 'What do I really feel about this? Do I like killing people? Do I like jumping on other people and taking over their oil and just killing whoever I want to kill to get it and justifying it by saying, 'We're freeing you folks?' No, I can't go along with that.

"When that song was getting all the flack, some guy called me in San Antonio when I was doing one of those call-in radio shows. On the show, I was talking about the line, 'Thou Shalt Not Kill.' He called up and he said, 'That really doesn't mean that. That means under certain conditions, it's OK.'

"I said, 'Well, you know, I think way back when, God knew how to spell. So if He says, 'Thou Shalt Not Kill,' that's what He meant. He could have said, 'Thou Shalt Not Kill Unless You Have A Very Good Reason.'

"If the churches in the world are set up to bring about peace on earth, where are they at now? I mean, whose side are they on? How can they be for peace on earth and still say, 'Let's attack anybody who don't like us, let's force them into being Halliburton employees. It's the best thing for them.' You can't drop 150,000 troops down in Oklahoma City and say, 'OK, guys, here we are. We like that old oil over there.'

"When He said, 'Peace on earth,' was he just kidding? Isn't that really what we're supposed to be trying to do? I mean, are we going to put peace on earth on the back burner while we go over and take over a few countries? And then it will be peace on earth?"

He's doing his part by voting with his pocketbook, and his lifestyle. "My wife and I are driving cars that operate on vegetable oil," he offered. "The exhaust smells like french fries. On Maui there are several hundred cars now that run on vegetable oil. Neil Young's buses are running on vegetable oil. When I go out again, we're going to be running on vegetable oil. Because it's available and it's no more expensive and it's not screwing up the environment. There are so many reasons to do it. Fifty years from now there won't be any oil according to all the geniuses out there.

"There's a solar well out here that's running the whole town out here, running the well. I'm putting up a 100-foot windmill to do electric, to run the house and anything else it will run. I'm experimenting with all these things because I know we're running out of oil and we're running out of this, that and the other. The wind and the sun are good alternatives."

THERE'S SOME irony, then, that Willie's first chart action in too long a time was his duet last year with Toby Keith. "Beer For My Horses" was a change of pace for both Nelson and Keith, who has injected patriotism into his music in the same manner as otherwise undistinguished talents such as Lee Greenwood and Gary Morris. Keith's 2003 album Shock'n Y'all went quadruple-platinum.

Willie Nelson
Philadelphia Lawyer: Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, July 4, 2003. Photograph by John Carrico.

"That's part of what he does onstage, is he sings these kind of songs," Willie said of Keith, whom he regards as a friend. "And that's fine. But it's not what I've ever done. I think I may have sung 'Jimmy's Road' [the antiwar soldier's song he wrote in the early '90s for his album Who'll Buy My Memories? The IRS Tapes] a time or two on the stage. But I don't really want to get in there and divide the audience. I'd like to try to do everything I can to keep them together.

"Everybody likes 'Stardust'. Everybody likes 'Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys'. Everybody likes 'Beer For My Horses'. You can take music and use music to please anybody anywhere, I do believe, regardless of whether you're a Republican or Democrat?'

That understanding allows him to sympathize with the dilemma President George W. Bush faces. "People think they know that they can blame anything in the world on whoever has took on the job as the president. It's a stupid move for anybody to make, to run for president. Because what do you do when you win? You got everybody in the world firing at you. Honestly, for eight years he was governor here and I never saw him. He was a great governor. He said a couple of nice things about me one time. So I had no problem. I don't know how they talked him into running for the president."

That doesn't hold him back from championing a very different politician. For most of the past year, he's been one of the highest-profile celebrity backers of Ohio congressman Dennis Kucinich, an underdog from the very beginning and an underdog to the end. "He's a good guy, a good man. He's standing up for the right things," Willie said. "He's not an insider. He does all right in Ohio. They know who he is there. But in order for him to break into that league up there, it's gonna take a little more time. And maybe he doesn't want to break into that league.

"The reason he stayed in there and went around talking to people is that he wants the Democratic Party to keep some of its values, some of the things that it's known for. You got to hand it to him for that. I think Kerry should meet with Dennis and see how a portion of the party feels. I'm not a Democrat; I'm not a Republican. But I am interested." Even as he backed Kucinich as long as the congressman was a declared candidate, Willie raised money for John Kerry, doing a charity concert in Los Angeles with Barbara Streisand and Neil Diamond.

He's also remained active with Farm Aid, the organization he co-founded with Neil Young and John Mellencamp in 1985 to champion the family farmer. For all the high-profile publicity brought by Farm Aid concerts, it's been an uphill battle, he admits.

"We have fewer farmers now. We used to have 8 million. Now we're less than 2 million. We're losing 300 to 500 a week," he noted. "And that's the plan of the powers that be. That's the way that it's set up. Because they think fewer and bigger is better. I know that's not the truth. I know that when you take a farmer off his land, you also take him out of his home. That's just not the same deal. When you're talking about land that we're feeding our kids on, we need to know that it's done by somebody who feeds their kids on that land, drinks from the same water. And that's not the way it's happening."

He's sincere enough about those beliefs to set an example. "We have an organic garden up here that Ed and the guys have been working on all year," he explained. "We've got all kinds of vegetables, tomatoes and peppers over there come right out of that. These peaches here are from Fredricksburg down the road. The more people read the papers and watch the news and see what's going on in the food industry, they begin to say, 'I used to couldn't spell organic but, you know, now I need some."

In a stroke of good timing, Ed delivered a plate of boiled cabbage, fresh from the garden, to the bar.

While he ate his cabbage, Willie detailed how the same forces that have squeezed the family farmer off the land are squeezing folks like him off the radio. "You know, they're not playing outlaw music that much anymore. And so they're not getting outlaw commentary anymore. Most of the stations are owned by large corporations who program their music in Connecticut or somewhere. I remember the days when I could take a handful of records and go into San Antonio, Austin, and walk into the radio station and say, 'Hey, I'm going to be here in ten days, will you play my records?' 'Sure, man,' the disc jockey would say. He'd put it on and play the record. Ten days later I'd get a nice crowd over at the Broken Spoke.

"You can't do that anymore. One of the problems that I find with radio is that it's controlled by too few people. There are a few stations around that, you know, are still trying to do it the old way. And that's fine. And I think eventually it will win out. Because I don't think you can control music that much."

But he's hardly crying in his beer about airplay.

"I'm very fortunate to have all this," he said, surveying the room. "Honestly, it's a day-to-day, a moment-to-moment thing. Things will be all right now, but then in a second there will be a lot of unfinished business. So it's just a day-to-day. There's too much going on. I'm thinking about doing some things out here.

Willie Nelson
Honeysuckle Rose

"Remember those Tales Out Of Luck shows? [Willie and friends, including Merle Haggard, filmed a series of cowboy shoot-'em-up short movies in Luck.] There's some folks out of England who have a DVD company, they want to distribute some more of those. So we're going to shoot some more. I thought I would do one around the song Cowboy Blues' about the old cowboy who's laying there at night wondering if he still can. I thought that would be a good one. You remember 'A Horse Called Music'? Just get some songs like that and 'Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up To Be Cowboys'.

Although the peak of his film career came with the lead role in Honeysuckle Rose in 1980, followed by Red Headed Stranger in 1987 - movies in which he pretty much played himself, albeit coming off a tad more wooden than he does in real life - he's matured into a very credible character actor through more recent cameos in films such as Wag The Dog, a full episode of the TV detective series Monk, and a string of commercials including a major ad campaign for the Gap. His memorable line "My face is burning!" while sitting in a barber's chair in the 2003 Super Bowl commercial for H&R Block has been eclipsed by his most recent TV turn for Capital Metro in Austin, which touts alternatives to driving your car. The spot opens with James White of the Broken Spoke, Austin's historic honky-tonk, standing onstage and announcing Willie before looking around and mumbling to no one in particular, "Y'all seen Willie?" The scene cuts to Willie sitting n the back of his bus stalled in traffic, saying to no one in particular, "Are we there yet?"

"I may not be any better at acting, but I'm more comfortable in it," he said. "We're working with New Line to do a movie. I just met with the writer. Years ago I bought a script called Tougher Than Leather from the boxer and actor Tex Cobb and a friend of his in Philadelphia. We were going to do this movie with me and Kris Kristofferson, Morgan Fairchild, and Tex. It evolved from Diamonds In The Rough to Blood Diamonds, then another rewrite and another rewrite. But right now New Line is rewriting it again to do sometime late this year or next year. They're doing all the work and we just come down and set up."

I was getting comfortable enough to get personal and ask him how it felt, being in a room surrounded by your own image staring back at you. Was it weird, as my friend insisted it was?

"Well, you know, I look around the room here and think of a lot of good times and a lot of good memories," he said. "If nothing else, sitting around and looking at these pictures is a good enough reason to be here. It's nice to come back in here and look around and see where you've been.

"You want to go upstairs and see what it looks like?" he asked. "I haven't been up there in awhile."

On my previous visits, I assumed the stairs were fake, leading to nowhere, like a movie set. But these were real stairs. Halfway up the staircase, he stopped to show me his hidey hole, a crawl space built into the wall. 'It's my escape hatch if I need it," he smiled. He wasn't kidding.

The upstairs was hot and empty, lacking air conditioning or much sign of life. The main room was bare, save for a painting of Willie that appeared to be of mid-1970s vintage and a wood-cut portrait of Waylon Jennings, the only Waylon memorabilia I spotted in the saloon.

Another room had gym equipment and boxing gear - two speed bags, a headache bag, and several big bags. This is where he works out when he can, practicing martial arts and living up to the black belt he earned from an Austin instructor named Master Oh three years ago.

I hit the speed bag with one hand for a few reps.

"It's probably out of air," Willie said.

He was right. It was almost deflated.

I turned around just in time to witness Willie kicking one of the heavy bags. It wasn't just a swipe, like mine was. It was a hard, swift kick.

Whap!

Then he did it again. Whap! And again. Whap! Whap! And again. Whap, whap, whap, whap.

Every time the bag swung around after absorbing a blow, he kicked it again, hitting the sweet spot in the middle. Willie Nelson kicked the shit of out of the bag for two minutes straight, hard enough and relentlessly enough for me to quickly conclude I don't ever want to get in a street fight with him, no matter how old he is.

Which is the point.

The kickboxing demo convinced me he was neither old nor feeble. And he sure ain't dead. There is a whole lot more to him than I'd given him credit for.

Final visit, my ass. As I left Luck, Willie made that clear.

"See you back here again," he said.

Joe Nick Patoski's first article on Willie Nelson appeared in Zoo World magazine. He has written about him for Rolling Stone, Country Music, Picking Up The Tempo, Texas Monthly, The Austin Sun, and other publications.

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Read my MVP Q&A with Mickey Raphael, which ran in the next to last issue of No Depression. Order Willie Nelson: An Epic Life from Amazon here.

Those seeking all things Willie should visit willienelson.com and stillisstillmoving.com.


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