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You are here: Music » Features » Willie Nelson - Gonna Catch Tomorrow Now (page 3)
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Read my MVP Q&A with Mickey Raphael, which ran in the next to last issue of No Depression. Order Willie Nelson: An Epic Life from Amazon here.


Gonna Catch Tomorrow Now (page 3)

No Depression
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
September-October 2004

Willie Nelson
Charlyn Zlotnik
Cult Hero: 1977

His comfort level has allowed him to indulge in the weirder side of life. He's an avid reader of America's most documented psychic, Edward Cayce, and can quote from Cayce's writings. There was a time when a psychic surgeon hung around with the Family, performing healing "operations." He enjoys listening to paranormal radio host Art Bell as much as his pal Merle Haggard does.

The size of his extended Family is nowhere what it was back in the glory days. Back when, his entourage swelled into the hundreds. These days, the Family has been reduced to the core of his band (Mickey Raphael, Bea Spears, Paul English, Billy English, sister Bobbie); his crew, headed by Poodie Locke (who also runs what amounts to Willie's own personal beer joint, Poodie's Hilltop, for those times when he needs to reconnect with what brung him to the big dance); and a chosen few close personal friends.

He doesn't seem to miss leading a bigger parade. Life is much more manageable at this juncture. He's flexible and nimble enough to pick and choose his spots. He spends almost as much time on the Hawaiian island of Maui as he does in Luck or on the road, in one of the most beautiful spots on one of the most beautiful islands in the world. That's where his current brood - wife Annie and his youngest kids - lives these days.

"It's for my boys who are growing up," he says of the Maui homestead. "They were born around here. And then we moved over there. They've gone to the Montessori school here and now they go to the Montessori school over there. They're doing great. It's like another small little town. I have a lot of friends there. Don Nelson, the coach of the Dallas Mavericks, is a good friend of mine and we play golf over there all the time. He's real good and has a lot of money. So he doesn't mind losing. I say he doesn't mind. He can afford to lose. I'm sure he minds. We're more or less back down toward Hana. Me and Kris [Kristofferson] used to ride a lot over by the Hana Ranch. He was living there at the time. Me and my family would stay there and we'd ride over. Saddle up every day and go out and ride. It had 3,000 acres to ride on there."

WHICH MAKES it all the more unusual that he appears to be willing to put the sweet life on hold and gear up to promote It Will Always Be. Maybe it's because it's the first album in awhile to hold its own against his 1970s classics. Or maybe it's largely because of the sense of finality it conveys. There's no fairy dust, no Rob Thomas or disco whistles, just a collection of songs - three of them his - done straight away. "Tired", co-written by Toby Keith and Chuck Cannon, may infer weariness, but the title track (one of the Willie originals) reassures. Several cuts are straight-ahead classic country songs, particularly "I Didn't Come Here (And I Ain't Leaving)" and "Big Boody". He excels best as the ladies' man, performing spot-on duets with daughter Paula Nelson (who wrote the song they sing, "Be That As It May"), Norah Jones (bringing out her sultriness and jazz strengths in a way her last recording did not), and Lucinda Williams (getting low, lean and wanting on her song "Over Time"). Lucinda and Norah may be the truest Willie disciples of all, applying outsider thinking to recording and performing.

The irony is that It Will Always Be is a classic Nashville production. The Family Band stayed home for this one, with the exception of harmonica player Mickey Raphael. Willie ran down the list of songs he wanted to do with producer James Stroud, who lined up a state-of-Music City roster of studio musicians (including guitarist Brent Mason, keyboardists Matt Rollings and Steve Nathan, bassists Glenn Worf and Michael Rhodes, drummers Shannon Forrest and Eddie Bayers, and steel guitarist Dan Dugmore) Willie walked in and laid down scratch vocals, then did the serious vocals back at his Pedernales studio.

"That has a lot to do with the songs themselves, and the arrangements, and the band that James Stroud put together," Willie said. "Those guys are great. They played 'Big Boody' and they turned around and played with Norah Jones. Those guys are that good. The tracks were cut in Nashville and brought here. I went in and did my vocals over in the studio. Then they took the tapes back to Nashville and Norah came in and recorded, my daughter went in and sang, so did Lucinda. It sounded great."

He admitted that going back to Nashville broke the typical Willie anti-formula formula. "It was all done kind of different than I normally do things. Usually, we just go over and set up and play. But James Stroud is a good producer. That's where he shines. I had to put together the songs. He knew the musicians to call. I sent him a scratch vocal of some things, so he knew how it was supposed to go. He played it for the band. Those guys could get the feel of anything.

Willie Nelson
Pedernales Studio, 1996. Photograph by Jim Carrico.

"It's kind of a 'the-best-of' situation because I get to sit here in Austin out in the woods and sing with the great musicians out of Nashville, and I don't have to fly all the way up there. It almost sounds like cheating to do it that way. But with all the new high-tech things they have, they can do it OK. There's always a group of guys in Nashville who are the hottest thing going. And if you're a good producer and really on top of it, you know who they are."

Since he's Willie, he was even able to get Sugar Hill Records to agree to hold back the gospel album he recorded with his sister (tentatively titled Farther Along and originally scheduled for summer release, it's been pushed to an as-yet undetermined date), and to rush Lost Highway's September 14 release of the DVD of Willie Nelson & Friends: Outlaws And Angels (a superstar concert with Jerry Lee Lewis, Merle Haggard, Bob, Dylan, Kid Rock and others that he taped in Los Angeles last spring for a Memorial Day special on the USA Network).

"Those folks at Lost Highway, they've been good," he said, "so I want to try to give them a good shot." But Mr. Practicality is hardly wedded to the Nashville assembly-line concept. Given his druthers, he prefers the recording process be kept simple. The attitude reflects the truth that for all the other attributes heaped upon him, Willie is first and foremost a player. And players want to play, not waste time setting up. Emotion trumps technology any day.

"I'm lazy," he laughed. "So naturally, I like to go right back into the studio there," he said, nodding to the small spare room, no more than fifteen feet square. "That's where we did Rainbow Connection and the Ray Price album [last year's Grammy-nominated Run That By Me One More Time, his first duet album in 23 years with his 77-year-old mentor]. It's just easy to do. We all gather around like a radio show in there and sing and play around a single microphone.

"I enjoy both ways of making a record. Doing it this way with a guy like James Stroud, Chips Moman, or Fred Foster or someone like that, you turn everything over to him. You get together and say, "These are the songs I want to do and here's how I want to do them. Next thing you know, you're doing them in the studio. I enjoy that. On the other hand, I enjoy taking the band or David Zettner and do it simple."

The big studio down the road, Pedernales - which he lost in 1990 when he was hit with a heavy bill by the IRS, then bought back two years later with a little help from his friends - is busier than ever. "We got Pat Green in there now," Freddy Fletcher said of the third-generation Texas country outlaw. And Geffen's mixing down some rap group. Don't ask me."

But Willie can walk in whenever he gets a whim?

"It's getting harder," Fletcher smiled. "But we manage to move things around to get him in."

"Having your own studio has its positives and negatives," Willie said. "The good thing is, you can go do anything you want to, anytime you want to. The bad part is you can't put them out, you know, because you can only put so many things out."

Like, say, more than 2,000 finished tracks in the can. Some are with Shelby Lynne ("She can sing. God, she can sing"), some with fiddle maestro Johnny Gimble, several albums' worth with Merle Haggard, and countless others with his cutting and putting partner David Zettner. "We're still stumbling across things we have over there," he says.

Which explained why he's in no rush to do more. "I don't want to record right now," he said. "I don't want to record until I can play."

TWO DAYS after our talk, Willie played at Ray Charles' funeral in Los Angeles, performing Charles' signature piece, "Georgia On My Mind", the official state song of Georgia. Willie could hardly get through the performance. His voice intermittently cracked with emotion; he sounded spent and very, very blue. But B.B. King broke up while performing during the service too.

Willie Nelson
It Was A Very Good Year: Willie Nelson and Ray Charles. Photograph courtesy Rhino Home Video.

The bond was cemented long before Willie ever met Brother Ray. "I was playing clubs in Houston back when 'What'd I Say?' and 'Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying' were big," he recalls. "I loved him, all those songs. Jimmy Day could play any Ray Charles song," he adds, referring to his longtime pal and steel guitar legend who died in 1999. The impact Charles made with the release of Modern Sounds In Country And Western Music in 1962 was not unlike what Willie did to country with Shotgun Willie and Stardust a decade later legitimizing the music to the outside world as a cool sound that had soul.

A close friend said Charles was Willie's hero. It showed when he talked about him. "We played chess a lot," Willie said. "He kicked my ass more than once and enjoyed it, I guess, better than anybody. We was playing down here one time, we'd done a show together and he was staying over at a hotel. I went over to visit him and he invited me to play chess. I said, 'Sure.' And I kind of thought to myself, 'OK, I'll play chess.' The hallway was nice and bright and everything. We walked into where the table was and sat down. And not a light on anywhere. Then Ray brought out his chess set. All the pieces were the same color. It was a Braille chess set, where he could feel the pieces and play. And he kicked my ass really bad. Of course, in the dark, it's hard to play. I made him promise me the next time we'd turn on some lights.

"We talked a little bit about music whenever it came time to decide what we wanted to do together. I could be in one country and he could be in another. Whenever they asked him what he wanted to do, he'd say, 'Whatever Willie wants to do. Have Willie call me.' So I'd always call him. And whatever I wanted to do, he would do it. But it was mutual."

At least he'd had time to say his goodbyes. "We did a song together in the studio in April, 'It Was A Very Good Year'; we had some fun." The song, about aging and looking back, is included on Genius Loves Company, an album of Charles duets released by Concord August 31.

"[Last year] I was at his birthday party. He and Quincy Jones and two, three of us sat around and talked and had a drink and ate cake. Right after that I went to the Apollo Theater in Harlem for the anniversary of the theater and Ray got a tribute that night. I sang 'I Can't Stop Loving You'.

"You know, there are a lot of younger people than you and I already gone on," he told me with a soft sigh. "So it has nothing to do with age. There's those huge disasters that happen on the planet when 20,000 people get wiped out, and there's no age preferences there. We're all headed that way."

I COULDN'T wait any longer. I blurted out a question: What ever happened to "Whatever Happened To Peace On Earth?"

Last December, on Christmas Day, Willie was moved to write an anti-war protest song. It became a much-talked-about news item for a couple of news cycles, an impressive feat considering the song hadn't even been recorded when it became news; it was just a lyric sheet. But as quickly as it appeared, it vanished from the public eye. Had he been pressured to back off at the risk of being Dixie Chicked?

The question I had been hesitant to ask got him going.

1, 2, 3, continue to page 4

Read my MVP Q&A with Mickey Raphael, which ran in the next to last issue of No Depression. Order Willie Nelson: An Epic Life from Amazon here.

Those seeking all things Willie should visit willienelson.com and stillisstillmoving.com.

[visit Lost Highway Records] [visit Poodie's Hilltop]


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