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You are here: Music » Features » Willie Nelson - Gonna Catch Tomorrow Now (page 2)
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Read my MVP Q&A with Mickey Raphael, which ran in the next to last issue of No Depression. Order Willie Nelson: An Epic Life from Amazon here.


Gonna Catch Tomorrow Now (page 2)

No Depression
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
September-October 2004

Willie Nelson
Willie Nelson in the sanctuary of his tour bus on Rodeo Drive, Los Angeles, Ca, July 2004. Photograph by Jim Herrington

"It's perfect," he said, his green-brown eyes twinkling, illuminating the scruffy white beard and long mane of hair flowing out of his hat to below his shoulders. "It couldn't be any better."

I got a closeup of the cast on his left arm. Willie was holding it close to his chest like a gimp. The other hand juggled a tall Starbucks cup and a big fat joint.

"Pull up a chair," he said after we walked inside. He went around to the other side of the bar and pulled up a stool, assuming the role of a bartender ready to dispense whatever wisdom and advice was needed. He fired up the fatty in his good hand.

Perfect? But the hand...

"Oh, it's getting better. I've had to get some assistance, but I'm back to where I can roll," he allowed, passing the hemp bomber across the bar. "Some of my therapy is rolling and it's getting pretty good. This is the longest that I haven't played the guitar. It's still painful and sore and I'm not really jonesing to get back up there. I'd love to play, but I want it to feel good when I do, and I want to be able to play as good as I played the last time."

He didn't really have a choice but to take a break. "The last couple years, it was so painful, I was kind of dreading the next show," he explained. "It was getting worse and worse, getting numb. I'd wake up and it would go to sleep. I found out there's hundreds of thousands and millions of people that are going through this same thing, all over the world. I was just talking to a mandolin player awhile ago over on the golf course, a big ole boy. He had this same operation back in the '80s. He said it takes time, but he was back picking in awhile and he's still doing it."

The surgery shut down the show. "I couldn't see going out with a hand mike," he said. "I'm not saying I won't?' [He did just that at his Fourth of July Picnic in Fort Worth before going back on hiatus in preparation for a scheduled tour of minor-league baseball parks with Bob Dylan in August.] "If things don't get well, then I might be hiring out as a vocalist," he chuckled. "I've done that before. It's easy, you know." He can sing with the best of them, as he's demonstrated by pairing up with folks such as Ray Charles, Frank Sinatra, and Julio Iglesias. But Willie watchers know that's not the whole Willie. Even he acknowledged that.

"Songwriting is the easiest thing for me to do," he said. "It requires less effort and less thought than what it takes to learn what Django [Reinhardt, the gypsy guitarist] did on that last record. Writing's first. And I love to perform. I enjoy the interaction between us and them. That's good for your ego. It keeps you going and going back again. Me and the band, we enjoy being out there and we enjoy working. And we come home and we enjoy this for a little while. But we get ready to go back pretty quick. Everybody who knows us knows that's the way we are, even our wives and kids."

Willie Nelson
Razorcut: Willie Nelson, Nashville cat.

Then he startled me by acknowledging he was mortal.

"It's kind of like you stopped a big train for a minute. It gives everybody a time to stop and think, 'Whatever this is, is not going to last forever.' So we might as well enjoy the rest and take it as far as we can."

I had no reason to doubt him. All I needed to do was look into his eyes.

Those watery, soulful, puppy dog eyes have served him well.

Kevin Connor, who hosted an impromptu Willie radio performance with reggae legend Toots Hibbert on the lawn of Austin's Four Seasons Hotel during the South By Southwest festival in March, related how after the show, he walked up to Willie to thank him, and was immediately stopped in his tracks by Willie's eyes. "He didn't need to say a word. He said all he needed to say with his eyes," Connor said.

It's a similar observation to the one Eddie Wilson made 32 years earlier, when Willie and Paul English showed up at the beer garden of the Armadillo World Headquarters to talk about doing a gig at the hippie rock emporium that would become the foundation of Austin music. "Although he was in a house full of strangers, a few enlightened folks recognized him and approached him in awe," Wilson said. "I then observed a trait that has been consistent throughout his career: He suffers fools gladly, and as long as someone's talking to him, he does not break eye contact. It's a quality I've seen in only two other people - [former Texas governor] Ann Richards when being talked to by children, and Muhammad Ali when he's talking to girls."

Grant Alden told me he regards Willie as Yoda, the all-knowing, ancient and revered Jedi master of the Star Wars trilogy. Somehow that doesn't quite square with the flashes of a Baptist preacher conducting a tent revival that flare up sometimes when he's playing a show. I regard him as more of a Zen cowboy, always at peace residing in the moment, but ready to ride and shoot at the drop of a hat. He moves through the world as if bulletproof; even the IRS couldn't burst the bubble. There's more than a little Perfect World in the whole danged concept of Luck, Texas, designed for the inner kid hungering to play Cowboys & Indians. "Hey, let's go shoot 'em up!" "Hey, let's go rob the bank!" The street's long enough to re-create High Noon on a whim. And it's always 4:20 somewhere in Luck.

IN TRUTH, Nelson is a flawed figure. He's on his third family and his fourth wife, not exactly a surprise given his penchant for staying on the road. His life history is tailor-made for a country song, back when country was called country & western and really sounded like it. He and Sister Bobbie were abandoned by their parents as kids. They were raised by kinfolk. He grew up a hustler, just scraping by. He knocked around Fort Worth, a wannabe salesman attracted to the used car salesmen - real salesmen who could sell you the shirt off your own back - and through them became familiar with the Dixie Mafia. (There are stories about Roger Miller and Willie working as bellhops at the Hotel Texas that indicate he was no stranger to hustling illicit vices.) He learned music from Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys, who ably demonstrated time and again how to put on a show and dance (fast song, fast song, slow song). He learned the business of music as a disc jockey, debuting on KBOP in Pleasanton southeast of San Antonio.

Willie Nelson
For the Good Times: Willie and Waylon celebrating willi's 60th birthday at Antone's in Austin, Tx 1993. Photograph by John Carrico.

His entry into showbiz was playing in bands such as Paul Buskirk & His Little Men and Larry Butler's group before joining up as a Cherokee Cowboy behind Ray Price, the honeydripper vocalist who epitomized countrypolitan, the hybrid sound that was too smooth, too swinging and too hip to qualify as straight country. In the early 1960s he came into his own as a songwriter with "Crazy" (Patsy Cline's signature piece), "Hello Walls" (Faron Young's signature piece), "Night Life" (a classic for Ray Price and B.B. King), and "Funny How Time Slips Away" (which made the career of rhythm & blues crooner Joe Hinton) - but not before he learned the hard way about publishing, royalties, and composer credits. He sold the rights for "Night Life" and "Family Bible" (a top-10 country hit in 1960 for Claude Gray) for $50 each, figuring he could always write another song.

He was ambitious enough to front his own band, and made a comfortable living recording small hits, covering his own compositions on the road, and dabbling in television. For a spell in the late 1960s, he hosted his own weekly variety television show in Fort Worth, live from Panther Hall. But the system didn't much care. He was valued for his songwriting skills, not his performing or recording talents. It was telling then that he was a cool daddy by Nashville standards, favoring a razorcut hairdo, golf shirts, tight slacks and Italian loafers - about as outside the mainstream as one could get in Nashville those days.

Somewhere along the way, he got full of the Music City mainstream, the assemblyline production of hits, and the straight life. It didn't help that his house had burned down. So he came back to Texas, for the gig money, for the familiarity of home turf, and for the belated Lone Star version of San Francisco that was going down in Austin. Long hair and cowboy boots were suddenly cool. Beer and pot were held in equal regard. Recent arrivals including Doug Sahm, Michael Murphy, Jerry Jeff Walker, and Freda & the Firedogs were breaking down traditional music barriers. Rock and folk were sounding twangy. Country was morphing into something else. Audiences could perfectly understand Willie's band breaking into an extended twenty-minute jam on "Whiskey River"; after all, they'd heard the Grateful Dead and the Allman Brothers Band.

Whether it was being in the right place at the right time or finally growing into the role of Willie, he proceeded to lead a movement hat signaled a shift in popular music and marked the start of a continuum. He wrote in song cycles, as heard on 1971's Yesterday's Wine his last Nashville album), 1973's Shotgun Willie, 1974's Phases And Stages, and ultimately 1975's Red Headed Stranger. Even if the songs weren't all jewels, he was nothing if not prolific. David Zettner told the story walking into a Nashville motel room and finding him passed out with sheets of paper strewn about. The sheets contained the words to "Shotgun Willie", written in a single frenzy of inspiration.

By covering a collection of pop standards n 1978 for Stardust, still his best-selling album, he transcended country and left Nelson behind, evolving into a general all-purpose icon with a single name: Willie.

It's been 26 years of smooth operating over since.

1, 2, continue to page 3, 4

Read my MVP Q&A with Mickey Raphael, which ran in the next to last issue of No Depression. Order Willie Nelson: An Epic Life from Amazon here.

Those seeking all things Willie should visit willienelson.com and stillisstillmoving.com.

[visit No Depression] [Willie Nelson's website]


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