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Chingo BlingWalk Like Cleto

Austin Chronicle
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
June 11, 2004

H-town's Chingo Bling, hip-hop's Tamale King.

The oversized football jersey, diamond-studded braces on his teeth, and hubcap-sized medallion around his neck with his name emblazoned in silver are straight outta south side Houston, the H-town underground, hip-hop epicenter of the Dirty South. So are the tracks full of chopped beats, hot DJ mixes, and improvised freestyles about supersized egos, insatiable sexual prowess, nasty ho's, name-brand labels, and hustling on the street.

By contrast, the black cowboy hat, aviator mirror shades, leather duster jacket, rodeo belt buckle, and full quill ostrich botas are not. These icons belong to the northern Mexico vaquero and the Culiacán narcotraficante, not the gangstas on the bloque. In lieu of Hummers and pit bulls, his status symbols are pickup troques and fighting cocks (Cleto's the name, fighting's his game, and he drinks from a bowl with his name spelled out in diamonds). Mainstream MCs rap about slanging crack while doing the hustle, but this vato raps about slanging tamales, like his parents did, to get ahead. Cocaine, pork – it's all the same.

Chingo Bling is multiculti Texas in full 21st-century glory. The Mexicanismo edge instantly makes him one of the most intriguing, original, and hilarious hip-hop acts ever to blow up out of the Lone Star State. In Chingo Bling's mundo, shit is chit, shout-outs are chout-outs, DVDs are DBDs, and videos are bideos. Under the clowning and cussing, boasting and toasting, there's a message that bears contemplation, even if beats aren't your thing. Even when he's shilling, urging fans visiting his Web site to call their favorite radio stations to request "Walk Like Cleto," Chingo Bling's voicing hard truths:

"Fact: Latinos are the largest minority in the United States.

"Fact: Radio stations target Latinos for their advertising dollars.

"Fact: What you request doesn't always get played.

"Latinos are being: targeted, overlooked, exploited, undervalued."

The weathered ranch-style tract house on a busy thoroughfare near Gulfgate in southeast Houston hardly looks like a media empire in the making. Burglar bars cover the windows. A pickup is parked on the front lawn. Vendors push their carts in the streets. A grill at a nearby bus terminal advertises hamburguesas estilo Monterrey – hamburgers made the authentic Nuevo Leon way, just like home.

Inside this unassuming residence it's all business. Somebody's laying down tracks with Pro Tools in the small studio. The webmaster (www.chingobling.com) monitors traffic on the fan forum, which is getting 30,000 hits a week. Three guys stuff mailers with CDs, T-shirts (T-churts), posters, and merchandise. Sister Dalila is working the phones, doing her part to make Chingo Bling the biggest Tex-Mex hip-hop star on the planet.

Not that there's lots of competition. South Park Mexican, the biggest Tejano/Mexicano MC to date, is still cooling his heels in the can after being convicted of having sex with a minor. Kumbia Kings, the Corpus Christi act headed by A.B. Quintanilla III, the brother of the late Tejano superstar Selena, have boy band aspirations, not rap dreams. Cali Latino hip-hoppers Akwid don't resonate with Texicans.

Plopping down in the captain's chair in front of the studio mixing board, Chingo Bling removes his shades and reveals Pedro Herrera III, a twentysomething with a degree in business administration from Trinity University in San Antonio, which produced the Butthole Surfers.

"Pedro – that's my business side," he explains. "As Chingo, I say what the fuck I want. Pedro's in charge of the career. Chingo pays the bills. Chingo's out of hand sometimes."

The schtick comes honestly. His father and mother emigrated from Valle Hermosa in northern Tamaulipas to Houston. At 13, he was declared a youth at risk and sent on scholarship to a prestigious prep school in New Jersey. At Trinity, he focused on marketing and pulled a shift at the college radio station, KRTU.

"I was just a regular jock, but I'd say, 'My cousin Chingo's in town,' and all the phones would light up."

He started making mix tapes, rhyming and burning CDs a couple years ago, selling them out of the trunk of his car at flea markets and mom-and-pop record shops.

"I had no expectations, no pressure. It was me in my apartment thinking, 'I'm going to pay my phone bill with these 12 mix tapes I'm trying to sell.' You never know."

Since then, he's returned to his hood, releasing two CDs and three Mañosas bideos, a Chicano version of Girls Gone Wild. On May 5, 'Chingo' de Mayo, he dropped his latest CD, The Tamale Kingpin. He's also done bideos on making tamales with a tamale queen, and put out The Adventures of Chingo & Bash, a smoke-out road trip in the tradition of Cheech & Chong with his partner in rhyme Baby Bash. If nothing else, he's representing in a novel way.

"In rap, everybody's shouting out their name, shouting out their neighborhood, their part of town," he explains, "but nobody's representing the town their parents are from. That's what I did. I'm proud of Valle Hermosa, Tamaulipas. You hear me saying, 'North Tamaulipas, raise up!' Kids tell me no one's done that before. I'm telling our story."

Since the collapse of Southwest Wholesale, the distributor that nurtured the indie scene in Houston, acts like Chingo Bling have had no choice but to work outside the box. He makes being independent a point of pride, bragging on the cover of an earlier CD that "Bootleggers Avoid Him, Labels Can't Afford Him, Women All Adore Him." He tours (Boise, Phoenix, Portland, and Albuquerque), gets ink in publications like Lowrider and Murder Dog, and settles for radio play where he can find it.

"I'm stuck [being played] on Sunday nights. It's our curse, the Latino curse. Sunday is the day we barbecue, the day we picnic, the day we cruise, the day we get airplay. But don't get me wrong. I appreciate the play."

He's done the math.

"We're rabbits," he laughs. "The DNA of America is changing daily. Places where there weren't many Mexicans, where there weren't many oranges to pick, are full of Mexicans now. I feel like we're on the brink of what hip-hop was when it first started. What's the word I'm looking for? Exponential growth!

"With so many of us here, so many multiplying, and still my cousins coming over, somebody's got to make movies for us, somebody's got to make DVDs, somebody's got to entertain us. I doubt it's going to be the old fat guy in New York who works for NBC. I think I'm going to beat him to the punch."

He cites New Orleans cottage industry Master P and Austin's cinematic big dog Robert Rodriguez as role models.

"I learned the independent route from Master P. His movie I'm Bout It started the whole direct-to-video B-film black-action urban-drama explosion that's taking up all the shelf space at Blockbuster. They're cutting checks to whoever will bring them the next cholo movie, Barrio Weekend, Lowrider Summer, or gangster flick with two brothers going across.

"Rodriguez is a player. The studios, which are like record labels, want to own him and get what they can out of him, so he can produce and become part of the machine. But he won't play by the rules. 'You guys in Hollywood are too traditional; you overspend. Your movies aren't profitable. I'm going to set up shop out of my house in Austin and cut out so many middlemen.' That's slowly what we're doing here.

"There's so much more to being independent than just getting $8 a CD instead of 75 cents. When you're with a major, they tell you, 'This is your release date.' They're going to walk me down the hallway. 'This is Susie, she's going to be doing your artwork. This is Josh, Michael, and William – they're your marketing team.' They're going to misspend money, and I'm going to have to pay for it."

He prefers working the tamale angle.

"My dad sold tamales at his job for 30 years. He would take my mom's tamales to work and sell them. I know people who've been able to quit their construction jobs and set up shop, selling tamales. That's the spirit of hip-hop – the hustler. 'I'm cooking this, wrapping that, selling this.' That's a hustler and a half.

"People don't think selling tamales is an honest living. Why do they look up to drug dealers? Because they're entrepreneurs and independent and they're living lives? Hey, if that's the case, I'll sell tamales and I ain't got no permit. I'm on the corner, too. I got my Igloo."

[Walk Like Cleto in the Austin Chroncicle]


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