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Songwriter helps lead the fight against development

The Dallas Morning News
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
December 12, 2003

EL PASO - Tom Russell can lay claim as the "last" singer-songwriter in Texas. That's because he lives in a historic 70-year-old adobe home on 3 acres within spitting distance of the New Mexico state line.

The Los Angeles native, whose folk songs have been covered by the likes of Johnny Cash, Nanci Griffith and K.D. Lang, has lived in many corners of the world - Nigeria in wartime, Austin as it was emerging as a music scene, San Francisco and Brooklyn. But he now lives in the far end of far West Texas by choice.

The rural area is known as the Upper Valley, a swath of green bordering both sides of the Rio Grande for a mile or two as it meanders through the Chihuahuan Desert. The rugged western flank of the Franklin Mountains, the southern end of the Rockies that end in the heart of the city, provides a scenic backdrop.

"This is the last oasis in West Texas," says Mr. Russell, 55. "It's a refuge for heron, desert tortoises, egrets, raccoons, skunks, badgers, you name it. I have foxes walking through my yard every day."

But the days of Mr. Russell's idyllic retreat may be numbered. Progress in the form of two-story stucco houses built to their lot lines - crammed into subdivisions, five to eight homes per acre - are marching his way at a fast pace, with requests by developers for city zoning variances leading the way.

The first skirmish came last year when Mr. Russell and five of his neighbors managed to reroute massive overhead power lines that were proposed to run directly over their homes.

A controlled access highway completed two years ago to link Interstate 10 with Santa Teresa, N.M., has been a magnet attracting subdivisions, which in turn are attracting commercial developments.

Farming on plots of land less than 100 acres was already in decline in the Upper Valley, as it is everywhere in the United States. The sandy river-bottom soil is certainly productive enough. But the cost of planting, growing and harvesting crops, and increased competition from other countries add up to food and fibers being grown somewhere else.

Factor in what Mr. Russell sees as a city leadership overly supportive of growth and development at the expense of residents, and the Upper Valley becomes vulnerable. It is one of the few green spaces remaining in the metro area.

Yet those who support growth and development say that El Pasoans need housing and that it is being provided under the rules and guidelines set forth.

"Ownership of property is one of our basic rights in America, and it cannot be vulnerable to opposition without good cause," says Rex Smith, a landowner who purchased Upper Valley property a year ago and immediately sought a zoning variance from the City Planning Commission. "Progress happens, and it cannot be stopped."

Susan Austin, the City Council member who represents the Upper Valley, pushed for lower-density housing rules after initial protests. But she - along with the majority of the council - also voted to approve Mr. Smith's application for higher-density housing. That has prompted one of Mr. Russell's neighbors to mount a recall campaign of Ms. Austin.

Even if she has been the object of much wrath, Ms. Austin calls the activism of Mr. Russell and his neighbors "as passionate as any neighborhood group in my district."

But she pointedly adds that they should put their money where their mouths are. "A lot of people want to preserve the idea of having a ranch-size homestead without having bought a ranch-size homestead, including Tom Russell, " Ms. Austin says.

"Some of the people all over me don't even live in the city. They live in the county" - outside the city limits. "The city can regulate. There are no zoning restrictions at all in the county."

Seeking inspiration

Mr. Russell came to El Paso seeking the same sort of inspiration that artists such as Tom Lea and Luis Jimenez and writers such as Cormac McCarthy and Benjamin Saenz have mined so well. "He always loved places like this," says his sister Nan Lazzaretto, a schoolteacher.

Mr. Russell's home is a hideout of sorts, in the outlaw tradition, tucked behind a wall of trees, high brush and cane that suddenly materializes among the fields of cotton, chili peppers, pecan plantations and pastoral horse farms that define the Upper Valley way of life.

"I love that there is no scene here," he says as he doffs his cowboy hat to reveal a head of graying, wavy hair. "I don't have to worry about being seen."

Unlike Brooklyn, where he lived for almost 20 years before moving here six years ago, "people here are pleasant and neighborly," he says.

"Downtown El Paso is like a movie set. It's like things have never changed. I love being close to Mexico. I love the history. The Old Spanish Road up to Santa Fe is right down here. I grew up on Marty Robbins' 'El Paso' and the tales of gunfighters." As it happens, Rosa's Cantina is not too far down the road.

Sometimes friends stop in. Dave Alvin drops by whenever he's on his way from his home in Los Angeles to gigs in the southern United States. So does Ramblin' Jack Elliott.

A few years back, Mr. Russell hosted a border-town birthday bash for songwriter and visual artist Terry Allen that drew a gaggle of like-minded professional dreamers. Not everyone gets it. The late folk legend Dave Van Ronk, whose last recording was backing up Mr. Russell, likened El Paso's dry summer heat to being "in a pizza oven."

Cowboy songs

Mr. Russell started writing, singing and playing originals more than 30 years ago, inspired by hearing his older brother sing cowboy songs and seeing Bob Dylan perform "Desolation Row" at the Hollywood Bowl in 1964.

He taught criminology in Nigeria from 1969-70 during the Biafran war , then followed friends he made in Africa to Vancouver, British Columbia. A band performing Hank Williams songs on Skid Row moved him to think: "That's the job for me." He landed in Austin in 1974 during that city's nascent era as a music scene. Later, he drifted to San Francisco before landing in Brooklyn in the early '80s.

He shifted his focus to writing ("I'm a frustrated novelist," he says) and drove cabs to pay the bills. When he sang a song he'd written called "Gallo del Cielo" to one fare - the composer Robert Hunter, who collaborates with the Grateful Dead - he was encouraged to get back on stage.

Life in El Paso has suited him just fine. His adobe hacienda is filled with Mexican pickled-pine furniture and folk art. He just finished an open, Mexican-style patio. He has incorporated the landscape and local history into his work.

The critic John Swenson called Mr. Russell's ambitious 1999 song cycle The Man From God Knows Where as "close to a Homeric treatment of American history as we're ever likely to see." Two years ago, he released Borderland, which includes "When Sinatra Played Juarez," a song inspired by his ex-girlfriend's uncle.

The uncle, who found the house Mr. Russell lives in, used to play piano across the border when Juarez was a hotbed for quickie Mexican divorces. The location also satisfies Mr. Russell's jones for bullfighting and his love of the border, although twice he's found himself caught in the crossfire of warring drug gangs in Juarez.

Mostly, though, Mr. Russell's place offers refuge from a steady touring schedule that over the past half-year has taken him to Ireland, the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, Calgary and Edmonton in western Canada, and across the United States from Oregon to Maine - including an appearance on The Late Show With David Letterman, backed by Nanci Griffith in support of his latest album, Modern Art.

Small victories

Mr. Russell and five neighbors have won some small victories in their effort to ward off more developments. Last summer, they successfully lobbied the City Planning Commission to reduce zoning density from R3A zoning, which allows up to eight homes per acre, to R2A, meaning lots can accommodate no more than five homes per acre.

That may be the best outcome possible, says Elma Carreto, the chairwoman of the Planning Commission. She says she sympathizes with Mr. Russell and insists the commission's goal is to make sure planned developments conform to the existing area.

She says existing infrastructure, including roads, bridges, police, firefighters and schools, are not prepared to handle the traffic that 2,500 new homes bearing families will bring. But she can go only so far, she says.

While Mr. Russell's songs classify him as a folkie, he is not known for political broadsides. His body of work tends to speak to larger philosophical issues, such as aging and loneliness. That makes his anti-development activism all the more unusual. "I don't have any political bent," he explains. "I don't write protest songs."

Instead, he has written letters, called the local chapter of the Sierra Club (the voice on the other end of the line urged him to play at a weekly meeting), attended planning commission and council meetings, and spoken out. "This is not a left-wing or right-wing argument - it's right or wrong," he says.

"There's no real plan for this area. They just want to develop here while the interior of the city begs to be redeveloped. The leaders don't see the big picture. They just want to develop, develop and develop until there isn't anywhere left. We don't need another 7-Eleven. There's a Circle K a quarter-mile down the road. Lowe's and McDonald's will be next. The prognosis is pretty sad.

"You don't do this to farmland. You don't do this to your children. It's corrupt thinking."

His heels are dug in deep. "I'll take my stand here," he says. "Maybe import some donkeys and ducks and pigs, and no one will want to live next to me. I'm talking with some folks about buying up some land to keep it in farming. Other than that, I'm planting a lot of trees."

The dilemma has moved him to also do what he does best. "I'm thinking about writing a song about all this," he says. "Only it's going to be from the point of view of a fox."

[See Tom Russell's website]


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