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Sunday Evening Coming Down (page 4)

The Resentments
At The Burly Gates: Newcomb, Graham, Hughes, Bruton and Chipman. Photograph by Carlos San Miguel.

No Depression
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
March-April 2004

For Chipman, the Resentments are therapy. "Once a week I get to have a three-hour session with these incredible songwriters who are also incredible players. I'm never shocked by what I hear coming off the stage from any one of these guys. We may play the same song a hundred times, but every time, it comes out different."

He knows he'll never fill Treanor's shoes. "It was real tough at first [replacing Mambo]; I was one of his admirers. There will never be another John Treanor. If you sat down and took a tape of him to a professor of percussion pedagogy, they'd say, 'What's going on there?' I had to listen to him for ages and ages to realize that this guy, when he plays time, he'd make certain limbs swing, then do a straight eighth-note pulse with other limbs, perfect timing, but with a pulse that would ebb and flow in synch with the soloist.

"I've never heard anyone do that in that fashion. Most of the time, that would sound choppy. With Mambo it'd just sound smooth. It's insane. I spent hours trying to replicate what he did naturally and finally gave up. The first month or so, I was constantly second-guessing myself: Is this what Mambo would've done? I finally realized, they haven't told me l stunk yet, and I keep coming back."

TREANOR'S DEATH on August 20, 2001, was the wake-up call. Toward the end, he was tying his arm above the cymbal stand in order to be able to hold it over the drums and play because he was too weak to raise his arm. "I asked him, 'Mambo, why are you doing that?" Graham recalls. "He said, 'Because if I don't do this, I can't play.' That is the lesson of the whole fuckin' thing, right there."

"He was profound," Bruton agrees. "And not only his drumming. He personified the Resentments attitude."

Graham and Newcomb visited him in the hospital the day before he died. "It was a Sunday," Graham said. "His mom, Lucille, called and said it was pretty bad. Scrappy and I came down later that day. It was obvious Mambo wasn't going to make it. He was passed out when Scrappy said to me, 'Maybe we ought to call the Saxon and say it ain't gonna happen tonight.' Mambo came to life and said, 'Nuh-uh. Go play the gig. I'm not scared.' He made it clear that to not play would be a disservice to him. It's still his chair. Chances are slim he's coming back to claim it, but if he does, it's his gig."

The Resentments
Saxon Angle: Graham (lap steel), Newcomb (mandolin), Bruton (guitar), Hughes (bass), Chipman (drums). Photograph by Todd V. Wolfson.

Things have been snowballing ever since.

Last year it began with their discovery by Germans on the last day of South By Southwest. "Someone got word of the Resentments on Sunday night," Bruton says. "Not only is it not part of South By Southwest, it's completely under the radar. How obscure can that be? These guys play one gig at one bar on one night of the week. So of course they loved it."

An invitation to tour in the summer followed. Hughes got the wheels spinning, thinking it'd be great to have a new CD to sell overseas (they'd released a live recording, Sunday Night Line-Up, in 2002). He organized the session and the artwork. They booked engineer-producer Stuart Sullivan's Wire Studios, and two days later, they had a self-titled album to sell on the tour. It was picked up by Austin indie Freedom Records for regional distribution last fall, followed by Freedom's nationwide release on February 17.

"We'd be laughing, cutting up like little kids half the time," Newcomb says. "We didn't even know what songs we were doing. Every song was one or two takes, max. Nobody in the band had ever been in a recording situation like that."

The tour took their collaborative efforts to a higher level. Maybe the covers had something to do with it, encompassing Dewey Redman's racy "Gee, Baby, Ain't I Good To You?" and the country spiritual "Long Journey" by Doc Watson's wife, songs that normally would be judged as strange bedfellows. With the Resentments, they were pieces of Americana that went together hand in glove.

Since the band returned stateside, the new disc has developed legs. Hughes' joyously loopy, self-referential stream-of-consciousness tune "People Ask Me" has been added to the playlist of influential Austin triple-A radio station KGSR - not bad for a song he wrote in fifteen minutes before he started laughing. "Fifteen minutes later, I had seven verses," Hughes says. "There is no rhyme scheme." But there sure is a great big sound backing up his words.

Another European tour is set for this summer. Another CD is being talked about. "The beauty of this band is you don't have to write twenty songs every other year to make an album," Bruton said. "With these guys, you can bring in three songs and have a new release on our own little humble situation and go to Europe and sell it."

It has certainly energized Newcomb. "It's becoming more of a prospect," he marveled. "I think everyone woke up to what's right under our noses. This could develop into a really great band, like The Band. If we had to go out all of a sudden for six months, I'd think it'd be the greatest thing that ever happened."

The Resentments
For The Good Times: Hughes and Bruton share a smile. Photograph by Todd V. Wolfson.

ON A SUNDAY in January when most folks are at home watching pro football playoffs on television, the loyalists drift in until the Saxon is packed by the time 7:30 rolls around.

Bruton hasn't returned from Delbert McClinton's Blues Cruise. No Bonnie Raitt, Ray Wylie Hubbard,James McMurtry, Freddy Powers, or Al Anderson are standing by, eager to sit in (all have done so at various past Resentments gigs, most recently Raitt in early January).

While Bruton's absence is noted with acerbic musings about whether he's gambling in the Bahamas, laying low in Key West, or was simply driven crazy by playing the same four chords every night, "with a harmonica thrown in every now and then," as Graham jabbed, it's no less of a band.

"It leave more room for those who do show to show our stuff," Hughes says about nights when colleagues are missing. "They're all mike hogs, you know." It's a nice way of saying there is so much competitiveness that a prospective off-night can be just as sharp and edgy. With Graham hauling out a boatload of lap steel pyrotechnics to keep the proceedings interesting, it is.

Somewhere in the middle of Graham's song "Big Sweet Life", they manage to get to that special place Hughes talked about the reason they play. The instruments lock into a groove that choogles, then soars, launched by Chipman's brushes. Five women and one guy respond by jumping up and dancing in the tight empty spaces between the tables in front of the stage, facing the band, urging them on, letting them know it feels all right. The room seems to levitate.

And though their fifth member is somewhere between Florida and Texas, his words ring true surveying the scene: "This is what happens when you let musicians do what they want to do when nobody's looking."

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