Joe Nick Patoski - joenickp.com
Google
 

Music | MTV's "Real World"

You are here: Music » Features » And the Hot Tub Goes to . . . Austin


MTV Real World Cast
The cast of "The Real World: Austin," the 16th season of the MTV reality show, which will have its premiere on Tuesday night. Photograph by Michael Muller/MTV.
And the Hot Tub Goes to . . . Austin

The New York Times
BY JOE NICK PATOSKI
June 19, 2005

WHEN Mayor Will Wynn of Austin announced last December that MTV's "Real World" would be filming its 16th season in his city, he did so with the enthusiasm of a civic leader who had just persuaded a Fortune 500 company to move to his neighborhood. "MTV has discovered what we all know, that Austin is a great place to live, work and play," Mayor Wynn declared. "We have a spectacular quality of life, particularly if you're young, energetic, educated, driven and have a passion for the outdoors and live music." The announcement was front-page news in the local paper, and it was deemed sufficiently important to be covered by news organizations around the world: "Real World" Discovers Another Cool City.

While the idea of playing host to seven hard-partying, hot-tubbing strangers ages 18 to 24, along with cameras and production crews for several months, may induce rolled eyeballs among the genuinely cool, a growing group of officials, civic leaders and economic advisers in a number of cities understand the value of being chosen to be host to "The Real World."

Jonathan Murray, chairman and president of Bunim-Murray Productions, which produces the series, is the man who makes the final decision about where "The Real World" films.

"It has to be someplace where young people want to go, or a place they should want to go," Mr. Murray explained. "When someone says" - and then he paused where the name of a city would be - "you go, 'Oh, that's cool.' Beyond that, the city has to be supportive of the idea of allowing us to take our cameras everywhere and not putting up walls. We've gotten everybody from the New York City subway to the Paris subway to the Austin airport to let us bring our cameras into places that major films can't get into."

Mayor Will Wynn
Will Wynn, mayor of Austin, in the house where it all takes place. Photograph by Bunim-Murray Productions.

The greater achievement is that cities are willing to cooperate despite incidents like the raid on "The Real World: San Diego" house in 2003 after a date-rape allegation had been made and an assault last year on a police officer hired to guard "The Real World: Philadelphia" house. He was attacked by several angry men, including two off-duty officers wanting to gain access to a party.

In exchange for the all-access pass, the occasional street closing and an inevitable brush or two with the law, the host city reaps 22 weeks' worth of free advertising, plus additional exposure in reruns and on DVD's.

"This is a postcard," Mr. Murray said of the series. "The images we paint aren't just pictures; the storyline and everything else reflect the vibrancy of the city we're in."

The consecutive choices of San Diego, Philadelphia and now Austin might suggest that Mr. Murray is straining for coolness, but ratings indicate otherwise. "The Real World: San Diego" was the top-rated series on basic cable among viewers 12 to 34 in 2004, seen by about 3.7 million viewers per episode, according to Nielsen Media Research. "The Real World: Philadelphia" has been the most-watched series on basic cable among viewers 12 to 34 so far in 2005, averaging three million viewers per episode.

Austin, the smallest city to be host to "The Real World" (the show has its premiere on Tuesday night on MTV), had been waiting for the call for years. Officially known as the Live Music Capital of the World, it is the hometown of the South by Southwest music, film and interactive conferences and the "Austin City Limits" television series and music festival.

"Austin, I'm told, is the largest city without a major-league sports franchise," Mayor Wynn said in an interview. "People occasionally ask when Austin will get a team. I say: 'You know what? I hope Austin doesn't get a major sports franchise.' I want music to be our major franchise, where a family every few weeks or months spends a couple hundred bucks on live music. How perfectly does MTV play into that?"

So if cities like Austin compete for the opportunity to win a season of "The Real World," why doesn't Bunim-Murray make like an aggrieved owner of a National Football League franchise and demand tax breaks, freebies or incentives? "We're not quite that arrogant," Mr. Murray explained over a soda in the lobby bar of the Four Seasons in Austin, two blocks from the cast house where the wrap party would be held the following day.

Mr. Murray cites the Palms Casino Hotel in Las Vegas, where the cast of "The Real World: Las Vegas" lived during Season 12, as the best example of how hosts benefit from the show.

"George Malouf really stepped up," he said of the hotel's owner. "Most of the hotels in Vegas are owned by three or four companies, and all of them wanted to work with us. But when we went to see George, his hotel wasn't done. He was still building. He walked us in and basically said, 'I can make this anything you want it to be.' We made it into a high-roller's suite, which he effectively uses and markets to this day. I don't think there's a better example of someone taking the 'Real World' cool factor and commercializing it to great success."

Last season's choice, Philadelphia, was Mr. Murray's most unexpected selection. "Philadelphia, more than any city I know, recognized they really need 'The Real World,' " he said.

He had first visited Philadelphia when he was a college student and had observed a rebirth of its poorer areas. "More kids go to college in the Philadelphia area than Boston, but the majority leave when they graduate, and they need to change the image of that city," he said. "They've been working on that, and as part of that, the mayor and the folks there recognized that if they could get 'The Real World,' that would go a long way toward changing the image among young people." When a labor protest prompted Bunim-Murray to pull out, Mayor John F. Street and Gov. Edward G. Rendell intervened.

The upside for that city was an improved perception among an audience that the city had already singled out. Having two gay characters instead of the usual one for "The Real World: Philadelphia" dovetailed neatly with a gay-themed tourism campaign that had already begun, said Sharon Pinkenson, executive director of the Greater Philadelphia Film Office.

Mr. Murray is mum about where "The Real World" goes next but dropped a few hints. "There aren't a lot of overseas places that are on my idea list, but Sydney has been a place I want to go to," he said.

Canada was mentioned. Meaning Vancouver or Toronto? "Or Montreal," he said with a poker face.

"I'm tracking 10 to 15 cities to see what they're doing, what's going on," Mr. Murray said. "I probably have a list of six or seven cities in my head. There are cities like Philadelphia I wouldn't have considered 10 years ago. Just because you're not on my list today, that doesn't mean you won't be in a year or so."

And if you are, Mr. Murray is confident that the feeling will be mutual. "When we're through with a city," he said, "they love us."

[visit The New York Times]

Correction: July 10, 2005, Sunday:
An article on June 19 about the value derived by a city that plays host to the MTV series "The Real World" misspelled the surname of an owner of the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas, where the cast of the show's 12th season lived. He is George Maloof, not Malouf.


Home - Contact - News/Appearances - Notes & Musings - Bio
Bibliography - Books - Music - Texas - Travel
Water - Misc - Photos - Links -

Copyright 2008 © Joe Nick Patoski, All Rights Reserved. - Website design: Jodi Jenkins